Google to bring Android to cars with a little help from Audi, GM, Hyundai, Honda and NVIDIA

Google to bring Android to cars with a little help from Audi, GM, Hyundai, Honda and NVIDIA

Already with more than one billion activations on mobile and media devices, Google’s Android is set to make an impact on another major industry: automobiles. Following rumors that the search giant was working with Audi to embed its open-source OS inside its cars, the company confirmed today it has teamed up with five automotive and technology companies (with more expected in the future) to form the Open Automotive Alliance. Alongside Audi, Google will be joined by General Motors, Hyundai, Honda and chip-maker NVIDIA, which will all work to bring Android to cars starting this year. The coalition aims to create a common platform that will drive innovation and in turn make cars “safer and more intuitive for everyone.” With Apple and Nokia already pushing hard to bring their own software to cars — Apple already counts Honda, GM and Hyundai as Siri Eyes Free partners — 2014 could be a big year for connected cars. SOURCE: Open Automotive...

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Not All “Viruses” Are Viruses: 10 Malware Terms Explained

Not All “Viruses” Are Viruses: 10 Malware Terms Explained

Most people seem to call every type of malware a “virus”, but that isn’t technically accurate. You’ve probably heard of many more terms beyond virus: malware, worm, Trojan, rootkit, keylogger, spyware, and more. But what do all these terms mean? These terms aren’t just used by geeks. They make their way into even mainstream news stories about the latest web security problems and tech scares. Understanding them will help you understand the dangers you’ve heard about. Malware The word “malware” is short for “malicious software.” Many people use the word “virus” to indicate any type of harmful software, but a virus is actually just a specific type of malware. The word “malware” encompasses all harmful software, including all the ones listed below. Virus Let’s start with viruses. A virus is a type of malware that copies itself by infecting other files,  just as viruses in the real world infect biological cells and use those biological cells to reproduce copies of themselves. A virus can do many different things — watch in the background and steal your passwords, display advertisements, or just crash your computer — but the key thing that makes it a virus is how it spreads. When you run a virus, it will infect programs on your computer. When you run the program on another computer, the virus will infect programs on that computer, and so on. For example, a virus might infect program files on a USB stick. When the programs on that USB stick are run on another computer, the virus runs on the other computer and infects more program files. The virus will continue to spread in this way. Worm A worm is similar to a virus, but it spreads a different way. Rather than infecting files and relying on human activity to move those files around and run them on different systems, a worm spreads over computer networks on its own accord. For example, the Blaster and Sasser worms spread very quickly in the days of Windows XP because Windows XP did not come properly secured and exposed system services to the Internet. The worm accessed these system services over the Internet, exploited a vulnerability, and infected the computer. The worm then used the new infected computer to continue replicating itself. Such worms are less common now that Windows is properly firewalled by default, but worms can also spread in other ways — for example, by mass-emailing themselves to every email address in an affected user’s address book. Like a virus, a worm can do any number of other harmful things once it infects a computer. The key thing that makes it a worm is simply how it copies and spreads itself. Trojan (or Trojan Horse) A Trojan horse, or Trojan, is a type of malware that disguises itself as a legitimate file. When you download and run the program, the Trojan horse will run...

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